Children - Teenagers


IRON DEFICIENCY ANAEMIA IN TEENAGERS

Teenagers are vulnerable to iron deficiency because of increased iron requirements
related to rapid growth and developmental changes. This is of particular importance in
teenage girls, who are ten times more likely to develop iron deficiency anaemia than
boys. 1,2

THE IMPORTANCE OF IRON IN TEENAGERS

Iron deficiency can affect development and school performance. Teenagers with anaemia
have decreased verbal learning and memory, as well as low standardised math scores.
Correcting iron deficiency may improve learning skills. 2

EATING HABITS CAN PUT YOUR CHILD AT RISK OF IRON DEFICIENCY ANAEMIA

It's hardly surprising that most teenagers often have eating habits that do not follow dietary
recommendations. Less than 2 % of teenagers eat enough of all food groups and almost 20 %
of girls and 7 % of boys do not eat enough of even one of the food groups. About 75 % of
teenage girls do not meet their dietary requirements of iron, compared to only 17 % of teenage
boys. 2 Even the slightest case of iron deficiency anaemia can slow cognitive development. 1

RISK FACTORS FOR IRON DEFICIENCY ANAEMIA IN TEENAGERS: 2

  • Low intake of meat, fish, poultry or iron fortified foods
  • Frequent dieting and restricted eating
  • Meal skipping
  • Chronic or significant weight loss
  • Heavy menstrual periods
  • Rapid growth
  • Participation in endurance sports
  • Intensive physical training

RISK FACTORS BY GENDER

* Boys 1

  • Iron needs are increased during puberty due to higher blood volume, muscle mass and myoglobin.

* Girls 1,2

  • Menstruation increases the risk of iron deficiency anaemia throughout their teenage and childbearing years.            
  •  o Particularly with heavier than normal menstrual bleeding, which affects 10 % of women in the United States.

* Teenage girls often don't get enough iron to keep up with menstrual losses.

  • Girls can lose between 20 to 58 mg of iron per month.

SYMPTOMS OF IRON DEFICIENCY ANAEMIA IN TEENAGERS 2,3,4

  • Tiredness
  • Weakness
  • Dizziness and fainting
  • Irritability
  • Headache
  • Pale skin
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Decreased appetite

Fortunately iron deficiency is easily treated with Ferrimed®, SA's #1 prescribed iron treatment. 5 Ferrimed® is clinically proven to be well tolerated6, and is the treatment of choice in children. 7

For more information, please speak to your doctor or pharmacist. For full prescribing information refer to: Ferrimed® Package Insert

References:
  1. Alton I. Iron Deficiency Anemia. Guideline for Adolescent Nutrition Services. Chapter 9. [online] 2005 [cited 2011 May 11]. Available from URL: http://www.epi.umn.edu/let/pubs/adol_book.shtm
  2. Anemia in Adolescents: The Teen Scene. Part 3. National Anemia Action Coucil (NAAC) [online] January 14, 2009 [cited 2010 March 10] [available from: URL: http://www.anemia.org/patients/feature-articles/content.php?contentid=000348
  3. Suite101. How to prevent Iron Deficiency Naturally. Iron absorbtion through eating healthy foods and vitamins. [online] 7 Oct 2009 [cited 2010 Mar 30] Available from: URL: http://nutrition.suite101.com/article.cfm/how_to_prevent_iron_deficiency_naturally
  4. Iron deficiency anemia. Symtoms. MayoClinic.com [online] [cited 2010 Mar 30] Available from: URL: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/iron-deficiency-anemia/DS00323/DSECTION=symptoms
  5. IMS Data.
  6. Langstaff RJ, Geisser P, Heil WG, Bowdler JM. Treatment of iron-deficiency anaemia: a lower incidence of adverse effects with Ferrum Haussmann than ferrous sulphate. Br J Clin Res 1993;4:191-198.
  7. Borbolla JF, Cicero RE, Dibildox M, Sotres D, Gutièrrez R. Iron hydroxide polymaltose complex vs iron sulphate in the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia in infants. Revista Mexicana de Pediatra 2000;57(2):63-67.

"The health information contained herein is provided for educational purposes only and is not intended to replace discussions with a healthcare provider"

Takeda Nycomed logo

S0 Ferrimed® Capsules / H840 (Act 101 of 1965) / Each capsule contains 50 mg elemental iron as iron (III)-hydroxide polymaltose complex and 150 µg folic acid. S0 Ferrimed® D.S. Chewable Tablets / L/8.3/201 / Each tablet contains 100 mg elemental iron as iron (III)-hydroxide polymaltose complex. S0 Ferrimed® Syrup / H842 (Act 101 of 1965) / Each 5 ml contains 50 mg elemental iron as iron (III)-hydroxide polymaltose complex.


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